Course descriptions professional phase of the MSAT program:

 

DPT 500: Gross anatomy (5)

This course covers the study of human anatomical structures. Specimens, models, and videos aid a regional approach to the study of structures. The course consists of both lectures and laboratory experiences with pro-section and cadaver dissection. This course also includes a comprehensive study of the microscopic and submicroscopic structure of mammalian tissues.  Pre-requisite courses: 8 credits of human anatomy and physiology.

 

AT 510: AT Clinical Procedures 1 (3)

This course covers the study of foundational clinical procedures in athletic training.  Foundational skill sets will provide the students the skills necessary to function at a proficient level at each clinical site.  Skill sets include but are not limited to; recognition of and the selection and application of immediate care techniques for instances of sudden cardiac death, the   fitting of protective equipment, protective padding/splint fabrication, and the selection and application of taping and wrapping techniques and the selection and application of assistive devices. The foundations of therapeutic exercise and modalities (selection and application) will also be discussed. Pre-requisite:  Formal acceptance to the professional phase of the AT program.

 

AT 520: AT Clinical Practicum 1(Clinical evaluation and pathology of the lower extremities) (7)

This course includes didactic lecture and the practical application of clinical skills via formal clinical education. Students will meet for 3 hours of lecture each week.  Students spend a minimum of 200 hours and maximum 320 hours working with a preceptor at the university’s facilities or an affiliated site. Major foci for this clinical experience include: 1) evaluation and immediate care of lower extremity injuries, 2) the selection and application of foundational clinical techniques, and 3) an exposure to male and female (individual and team sports). Students are exposed to the AT’s role as an “entrance point” into the healthcare delivery system.  Patient oriented evidence that matters (patient choices, cultural concerns, social forces with regards to patient outcomes) are discussed. Pre-requisite:  Formal acceptance to the professional phase of the AT program.

 

AT 511: Clinical Procedures 2   (3)

This course covers the study of evidence-based clinical procedures in athletic training.  Students will select and discuss the best available evidence surrounding the following topics; 1) pain and pain management, 2) inflammation and tissue healing, and 3) the selection and application of therapeutic exercise and modalities to treat a variety of musculoskeletal injuries (Part 1).   Topics include: Infrared Modalities (heat and cold), Ultrasound, Mechanical Energy and standard therapeutic exercise techniques. Students spend 2 hours in lecture and 2 hours in lab. 

 

AT 521: AT Clinical Practicum 2(Clinical evaluation and pathology of the upper extremities) (7)

This course includes didactic lecture and the practical application of clinical skills via formal clinical education. Students will meet for 3 hours of lecture each week.  Students spend a minimum of 200 hours and maximum 320 hours working with a preceptor at the university’s facilities or an affiliated site. Major foci for this clinical experience include: 1) evaluation and immediate care of upper extremity injuries, 2) the selection and application of evidence based clinical techniques, and 3) an exposure to male and female (individual and team sports).  Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of AT 520.

 

AT 610: AT Clinical Practicum 3 (Immersive clinical experiences 1), (6)

This course includes the practical application of clinical skills via formal clinical education. This course will follow an 8 week modular approach and will include an immersive clinical experiences at an approved clinical site.  This immersive experience allows the athletic training student to experience the totality of care provided by an athletic trainer.  Students will participate in the full-time day-to-day role of an athletic trainer.  Students will meet with the AT Program Director and CEC to determine the focus and nature of this clinical education experience.  Students spend approximately 320 hours working with a preceptor at the university’s facilities or an affiliated site.

The weekly student contact expectation is approximately 40 hours.  Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of AT 521.

 

AT 615: General Medical Conditions in the Physically Active (3)

This course will follow an 8-week modular approach.  The didactic portion of the course constitute 2 credit hours, the lab portion will account for 1 credit hour. Students will be instructed in medical conditions pertinent to the field of athletic training. The areas covered incorporate pathophysiology, (including congenital and acquired abnormalities, physical disabilities, and diseases), therapies, physical examination, and psychosocial aspects of the patient-provider relationship. These areas will be explored through a systems approach: nervous, pulmonary, integumentary, endocrine, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal, and genitourinary.  The lab portion of the class will meet approximately 2 hours per week for clinical skill instruction and assessment.

 

AT 618:  Pharmacology in Athletic Training (2 online):  Study of pharmacologic applications for injury/illness to athletes and the physically active.  Includes indications, contraindications, interactions of medications, and relevant governing regulations related to medications.

 

AT 611: Clinical Practicum 4:  (Immersive clinical experience 2), (6)

This course includes the practical application of clinical skills via formal clinical education. This course will follow an 8 week modular approach and will include an immersive clinical experiences at one of our approved clinical sites.  This immersive experience allows the athletic training student to experience the totality of care provided by an athletic trainer.  Students will participate in the full-time day-to-day role of an athletic trainer.  Students will meet with the AT Program Director and CEC to determine the focus and nature of this clinical education experience.  Students spend approximately 320 hours working with a preceptor at the university’s facilities or an affiliated site. Of the 320 hours, students will spend approximately 40 hours with a preceptor at a general medical facility.  Students at this portion of the rotation will interact with patients with “general medical conditions” and/or with patients with chronic illness and disabilities.  The weekly student contact expectation is approximately 40 hours. 

 

AT 620: Clinical Pathology and Differential Diagnosis: (2)

This course explores clinical pathology and pathophysiology associated with systemic disease. Students will focus on the use of evidence-based practice concepts to generate a complete differential diagnosis and clinical diagnosis.  Students will focus on the use of patient-reported outcomes and informatics to track patient data related to care.  Students will analyze these data and synthesize alterations to established plans of care or aid in preventative approaches to national health issues.

 

AT 625: AT Clinical Procedures 3: (3)

This course covers the study of evidence-based clinical procedures in athletic training.  Students will select and discuss the best available evidence surrounding the following topics; 1) the selection and application of therapeutic exercise and modalities to treat a variety of musculoskeletal injuries (Part 2).   Topics include: Electrical stimulation, Iontophoresis, Biofeedback, Laser and functional therapeutic exercise. Students spend 2 hours in lecture and 2 hours in lab.

 

AT 630: Evidence based practice: Clinical Research 1 (3)

This course explores quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used in athletic training and evaluation of published research in the field. This is a writing enhanced (WE) course. WE courses require a substantial amount of writing as a way to help students learn course content, as well as to support the development of each student’s writing ability.  Course grading will include assessments based on the demonstration of writing elements, such as a clear thesis, good organization, support or evidence for claims, proper grammar, and proofreading.  Research methodologies are discussed including:  with how to identify a research topic (PICO), how to perform a literature search and organize resources, and how to organize and write a literature comprehensive review of the literature. Students will then design a research and project, generate and research proposal and submit the proposal for Institutional Review Board approval.

 

AT 635: Evidence based practice: Clinical Research 2: Research Seminar (3) (Capstone Course)

This capstone course builds on and brings to fruition the work completed in AT 630.  Students will work in groups to complete their research projects.  This includes but is not limited to 1) recruitment of subjects, completion of all experimental methodology, collection and analysis of the data, and synthesis of results.  The student groups will present their respective projects at the local, regional or national level as appropriate.

 

AT 640: Healthcare Administration and Professional Responsibility            (2)

This course will cover content related to preparation for the BOC examination as well as professional development and responsibilities of the entry-level athletic trainer, including continuing education and ethical responsibilities. Students will complete a comprehensive self-study, practice examinations and course work related to test-taking strategies.

 

AT 645: Evidence based practice: prevention, conditioning and performance enhancement (3)

Course includes a functional and scientific approach to the design of strength and conditioning programs with sports nutrition concepts. Includes testing protocols used for measuring fitness, body composition, posture, flexibility, muscular strength, power, speed, and endurance. The sports nutrition component includes the use of nutrients to sustain and enhance life, wellness and fitness, as well as the use of dietary supplements or other performance enhancing substances.  Course includes 2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab weekly.

MSAT Master of Science in Athletic Training