Summer Session 2014

Blended Courses - Main Campus

Not sure if you’re ready to take a class entirely online? A blended class might be the perfect solution for you. This format offers the best of both worlds. You’ll still interact with classmates in person while you enjoy the freedom of studying where and when you want with online learning.

Students are responsible for communications software and internet service. There are both minimum and suggested requirements for computer setup. For more information, please visit our technology requirements. Each blended course requires additional hours of online instruction.

Enjoy the best of both worlds and take a blended class this summer!

Course Selections


Undergraduate and Adult Education


ART 103-60: Color and Design
Study of the elements and principles of design and experimentation in the physical, psychological and theoretical use of color as applied to two-dimensional design. Students will learn to conceptualize, visualize and organize original designs. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

ART 208-50: Painting I
An introductory course in painting using the traditional medium of oil. Basic studies in the formal and technical process of image arrangement and techniques are explored. Direct observation assignments and historical trends and painting methods are experienced.  Students are encouraged to enroll if they have had some experience in drawing or 2-dimension design. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

BH 413-60: Spec Issues Sem: Motivat Int
This course will address current issues within the field of addictions and mental health treatment.  Possible topics include: The role of gender and culture in therapeutic relationships, Bereavement, HIV, Adolescent Issues, Specialized Testing, the “Cultures” of Addiction and Recovery, Family Issues, Life Span Issues related to behavioral health and Program/outcomes assessment.  These courses are offered to broaden the student’s experience, as well as assuring that advancements and changes have a mechanism to be addressed within the program structure.  Course may be repeated for credit with different topics.  Depending on the issue(s) identified, this course can be utilized as an elective for one, two, or all three areas of concentration. 78% Contact 22% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

BUS 301-50: Advanced Accounting
Expands upon concepts learned in lower level accounting courses and presents major new areas for students to consider. Emphasis is placed upon business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and accounting for not-for-profit enterprises. Prerequisite: BUS 253. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

BUS 309-60: Advertising & Promotion
In-depth study of factors that go into promotion and advertising campaigns. Students critically examine elements involved in planning, research, budgeting, public relations, media selection, creative concepts, message appeal, cost effectiveness, and legal constraints. Emphasis is placed on important role of promotion and advertising within the marketing context. Prerequisite: BUS 207 or permission of instructor. 39% Contact 61% Distance Ed
Monday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

BUS 342-50: Business Law
Deals with the meaning and functions of business law as applied to negotiable contracts, sales, agency employment, real property, insurance, labor, anti-trust law, consumer protection, and other legal issues such as international, environmental, privacy, tort and criminal law. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

BUS 402-60: Auditing
This course incorporates principles of accounting with auditing procedures and Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS). The impact of decisions by the SEC and the PCAOB on the auditing profession will be emphasized. The auditor’s legal liability and responsibilities according to the Code of Professional Ethics established by the AICPA will also be reviewed and discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 301. 78% Contact 22% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

BUS 410-50: Financial Markets
Provides in-depth analysis of financial markets and how those markets facilitate the flow of funds to accommodate the needs of individuals, corporations, governments and the global market.The purpose is to study and understand the roles of the financial intermediaries in the market and how they direct funds in an ethical business manner. Prerequisites: BUS 101; Econ 248, 249. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

BUS 411-60: Corporate Finance
The role of the financial manager in the modern business organization is stressed. Topics include time value of money, financial analysis, risk analysis, financial forecasting, cost of capital, stock and bond valuation models, capital budgeting, investment decisions under conditions of uncertainty, long term financial alternatives, and dividend policy. Prerequisites: BUS 200, 410. 39% Contact 61% Distance Ed
Wednesday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

BUS 426-50: Strategic Management
Study of development and implementation of strategic plans conceived by executive level management. Students integrate previously studied topics in the business core curriculum along with new information dealing specifically with strategic management. Utilization of in-depth case studies allows students to sharpen their skills of analysis and to develop coherent and comprehensive strategic plans. Prerequisites: BUS 200 or 250, and 206, and 410; senior-level standing. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

BUS 434-50: Marketing Management
A capstone course in the marketing curriculum that integrates previously presented principles and practices.  The course is designed to develop an appreciation of the marketing executive's viewpoint which focuses on managing organizational resources to fully understand customer needs and wants; develop compelling offering of products and services; effectively communicate with targeted customers; capture and deliver optimal value.  Detailed case studies and projects will be used to explore the application of marketing theory to practical situations.  Course work will be oriented to consider profit-oriented, not-for-profit and public-sector organizations. 44% Contact 56% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

CJ 221-50: Research Methods I for Criminal Justice
Introduces students to fundamental issues associated with the application of scientific methods to criminal justice problems.  Topics covered include research design, the relationship between theory and research, types of research methods, ethical considerations, and data analysis techniques.  Prerequisite: CJ 101 and CJ 175. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

CJ 275-50: Criminology
Examination of classical and contemporary theories of crime, nature and causes of crime and criminal behavior as well as relationship between law and crime. Emphasis placed on identifying various criminological theories and their advocates to give student an overview of the many theories posited as causes of criminal behavior and crime. Course satisfies the social science core requirement. Prerequisites: CJ 101, 175. 45% Contact 55% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

COM 101-50: Composition and Research
Core writing requirement, reviews fundamental principles of rhetoric, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Requirements include a research paper using MLA documentation guidelines and several expository papers. Course is available only after placement by departmental faculty. Students must achieve "C" or better to fulfill core requirements. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed.
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

COM 234-60: Intercultural Communications
This course is designed to provide a survey of intercultural communication theory and practice and to develop a better understanding of human interactions in global contexts. We will study the relationship between the culture, behavior, and communication of individuals and groups, both internationally and nationally. Students will analyze and research how intercultural communication factors affect the way business, services, and communication are handled in various settings. Fulfills the Human Diversity Requirement. 39% Contact 61% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

COM 250-50: Interpretation of Film
Critical approach to analyzing film and its significance in contemporary society. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

COM 344-60: Writing for the Workplace
Advanced writing course oriented toward communication beyond the academic world. Assignments include correspondence, memos, resumes, proposals, oral presentations, and one or more major reports. Introduce students to current communication software, to familiarize with requirements of writing in their specific disciplines, and to help develop a clear, concise writing style. 39% Contact 61% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

ECON 248-50: Macroeconomics
Surveys the performance of the American economic system through National Income Accounting with emphasis on the aggregates of government, consumers and business. The focus is on total employment, total income, total output, general level of prices and the major current problems of unemployment, inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy. 87% Contact 13% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

ECON 249-60: Microeconomics
Surveys behavior of individual economic units (household and business firms) and the price mechanism interacting in the market structures of American capitalism. Emphasis is on the specific product price and specific amount of production in an efficient and profit-oriented competitive economic system. Prerequisite: BUS 248. 87% Contact 13% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

ENG 106-50: Short Story

Introduction to the short story genre through a critical and analytical interpretation of selected stories from world literature. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

ENG 207-60: Contemporary Fiction & Drama
Study of selected short novels, stories and plays drawn from world literature of the last 30 years. This course fulfills the human diversity graduation requirement. 39% Contact 61% Distance Ed
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

ENG 306-60: Modern American Fiction
Study of significant American novelists and short story writers from 1920s to the present, including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Salinger, Heller and others. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

MAT 110-50: Business Mathematics
This course is designed to provide a secure foundation in the fundamentals of Business Mathematics. Topics include: interest calculations, depreciation, statistical data and graphs, algebra of polynomials, roots, radicals and exponents, relations and functions, exponential functions and their graphs. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.  
May 12 - July 2


MAT 208-50: Introductory Statistics

This course in applications of statistics and probability is designed for such areas as sociology, business, economics, medicine and psychology. Topics include descriptive statistics, data organization and graphical methods, laws of probability, rules review of probability, linear correlation and regression, binomial and normal distributions, sampling and statistical inference. Varied computer applications, using the statistical software package SPSS, are required. Not open to math or science majors. Students earning credit for this course cannot earn credit for MAT 209. Prerequisite: satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test. 80% Contact 20% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:10 p.m. -  8:10 p.m.   
May 12 - July 2

MAT 208-60: Introductory Statistics
This course in applications of statistics and probability is designed for such areas as sociology, business, economics, medicine and psychology. Topics include descriptive statistics, data organization and graphical methods, laws of probability, rules review of probability, linear correlation and regression, binomial and normal distributions, sampling and statistical inference. Varied computer applications, using the statistical software package SPSS, are required. Not open to math or science majors. Students earning credit for this course cannot earn credit for MAT 209. Prerequisite: satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test. 80% Contact 20% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:10 p.m. -  8:10 p.m. 
July 3 - August 21

MUS 121-50: Introduction to Music
Presentation of basic elements of music, important forms, types and representative styles and works. Promotes more intelligent listening to music, especially classical music. 45% Contact 55% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.   
May 12 - July 2

NUR 320-5RN: Intro to Healthcare Informatics
This course introduces the student to an overview of the basic concepts of healthcare informatics. This course integrates nursing science with computer technology and information science used to enhance the student's use of information technology for developing, evaluating, and disseminating health care information. This course is limited to professional RNs. Pre- or co-requisite: NUR 303. 57% Contact 43% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PED 304-50: Wellness for Life
Study of the concepts that contribute to a lifestyle of wellness. Topics include principles of wellness, principles of community health, non-infectious diseases, accident and injury prevention, AIDS, STDs, nutrition, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, strength, mental and emotional health, personality traits, stress, steroids, cancer, and substance abuse. Students appraise their personal wellness levels and design a personalized fitness program that is practically applied. 44% Contact 56% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PHI 200-50: Introduction to Ethics
Systematic study of ethics with the aim of arriving at objective values and principles of moral conduct as the means to genuine happiness. Normative ethics is compared and contrasted with descriptive ethics and meta-ethics. Cultural, philosophical and historical approaches to ethics are also considered. Fulfills Ethics/Morality Requirement. 44% Contact 56% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
 
May 12 - July 2

PHY 110-A: General Physics I
Introduction to standard non-calculus college physics course. Topics include Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, impulse, momentum, properties of solids, liquids, and gases, heat, and the laws of thermodynamics. Course includes three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: high school algebra. 75% Contact 25% Distance Ed
WKDY, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
May 12 - May 30

PHY 111-B: General Physics II
Continuation of Physics I. Topics include wave phenomena, electricity, magnetism, light, sound, optics, relativity and quantum theory. Prerequisite: PHY 110. 75% Contact 25% Distance Ed
WKDY, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
 June 16 - July 3

PSY 250-60: Intro to Psychopathology
This is a survey course covering basic knowledge of mental illness and maladaptive behavior.  The etiology, ccal picture and treatment of various syndromes are discussed.  Prerequisite: PSY 101. 78% Contact 22% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 8:00 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

SPA 102- 60: Spanish for Beginners II
Continuation of Spanish 101.  Prerequisite: SPA 101 or equivalent. 83% Contact 17% Distance Ed
Tuesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

SW 209-60: Death, Dying, & Bereavement
This course explores the universal and profound experience of death, dying, and bereavement.  Topics on terminal illness, the dying process, grief, and bereavement are emphasized, as well as how these topics are influenced by race, class, gender, cultural values, and religious beliefs.  Consideration will be given to the contextual perspective of death and dying with attention paid to the beliefs and needs of individuals, families, and communities as they relate to loss and mourning.  Special topics (hospice, children's bereavement, etc.) will be discussed.  This course fulfills the human diversity requirement. 78% Contact 22% Distance Ed
Monday/Wednesday, 8:00 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21 

THE 210-50: Medical Moral Theology
Investigation of moral problems which can arise in the area of bioethics. Introductory survey of the basic Christian principles of morality is followed by treatment of various medical moral situations. A natural law methodology is applied throughout the course. Fulfills the Ethics/Morality requirement. 44% Contact 56% Distance Ed
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - July 2


Graduate


MBA 575-50: Investments & Portfolio
This is an MBA elective course designed to enhance development of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors and values required for effective portfolio management.  The goal of the course is to increase students capacity to understand asset pricing, equity strategies, stocks, bonds and alternative investment strategies. Increasingly, unpredictable environments now require investment managers to learn, adapt and take advantage of new opportunities.
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  9:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MBA 600-50: Quantitative Methods
Quantitative Methods is designed to familiarize the student with the use of mathematical and statistical methodology used in managerial decision-making. Topics include linear, integer and dynamic programming, sensitivity analysis and duality, network models, inventory and queuing, and simulation.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  9:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MCC 530-50: Multicultural Issues in Counseling
This course will explore the social and cultural contexts of helping relationships. The ways that culture and ethnicity interact with human behavior will be examined. Theories related to cultural identity, age, gender, sexual orientation, family values, coping, attributions, attitude formation, social power, addictions, spiritual values, and socioeconomic conditions as they relate to impact counseling with diverse groups will be examined. Current research regarding issues such as client/counselor match will be analyzed. Ethical guidelines for counseling diverse groups provided by the American Counseling Association and similar professional organizations will be studied. Students will participate in experiential exercises and analyze case studies to apply theories and concepts to "real world" situations.
Monday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MCC 535-50: Counseling Children and Adolescents
This course focuses on unique counseling theories and techniques applicable to counseling early childhood and preschool children and their families. Play therapy, puppet therapy, doll therapy, creative arts therapy, in vivo therapy and other therapy modalities are explored. This course focuses on unique counseling theories and techniques applicable to working with adolescent youth, exploring issues of identity, peer acceptance, conformity and deviation, sexuality, experimentation with substances, youth culture and issues of youth in the contemporary society.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
May 12 - July 2


MCC 605-60: Counseling Special Populations
This course explores the increasingly diverse needs of distinct emergent groups in today's society. Counselors will be working with people from these groups and must have the skills  and knowledge to be professional and effective. These groups include, but are not limited to: homosexuals; ethnic, cultural and religious minorities; physically challenged individuals; and mentally challenged individuals. Counselors will be exposed to developing their multicultural competencies.
Monday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

MCC 615-60: Relapse and Recovery
Examines the psychological, biological and environmental perspective of the primary factors that contribute to the systematic onset and eventual occurrence of relapse. Through extensive research in journals and other professional publications as well as interviews with treatment professionals and people in recovery, relapse is examined as both an event and a process that for some individuals may be a predictable part of a sustained and life long recovery from addictions.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:20 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

MED 518-50: Quantitative Research Methods
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the use of mathematical and statistical methodology used in educational research. Topics will include descriptive statistics, introduction to inferential statistics, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, multiple comparison procedures, research design and the use of SPSS software.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MED 523-50: Practicum II
This 30-hour practicum involves placement and supervision coordination by the Director of Field Experiences, and focuses on the needs of second language learners and specific needs of children from impoverished urban school districts, many of whom also have special needs.  It should be taken concurrent with, or following, MED 548: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners for initial teaching certificate candidates or concurrent with MED 544: Transition & Instruction for Secondary Special Needs Students for those working for a special education certification.
Monday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MED 553-50: The School Administrator
A technical course emphasizing the principal’s role in the organization and administration of the elementary, middle and secondary schools.
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MED 650-50: Functions of School Supervision
This course is designed to provide a framework to help future principals gain the necessary skills to apply the emerging concepts and principles of school supervision to the practical, everyday situations in which administrators, supervisors, coordinators and teachers are working. Interpersonal relationships that lead to the improvement of instruction, data collection for the purpose of analyzing classroom teaching, staff development, in-service program development and staff selection will be discussed. The influence of special needs learners, race, gender and other social issues will be analyzed where appropriate for this course.
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

MED 685-60: Principals Internship
This is a required seminar and supervised field experience for those individuals seeking principal’s certification. The student will submit to his/her advisor a comprehensive proposal for a unit of work to be done under the supervision of a currently active building principal. The observation and supervision of teachers, along with other selected units of work from such areas as scheduling, budget preparation, staff development, curriculum, community relations, extracurricular activities, etc., comprise the list of acceptable projects for interns to complete. All proposals must be approved by the faculty advisor and sanctioned by the administration of the school where the field experience is to occur. In addition to the field experience, seminar meetings are conducted every other week for a period of two hours for all administrative interns for the duration of the semester.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
July 3 - August 21

NUR 535-MSN: Human Resource Mgmt in Healthcare Orgs
This course explores the interaction between leadership in health care organizations and human resources (HR), specifically designed for graduate nursing students. Traditional HR topics will be presented with an emphasis placed on an understanding of how this information interfaces with line management. Topics presented encompass the legal framework of HR, processes and policies of human resource management, such as recruitment, selection, talent management, compensation and collective bargaining.
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  7:50 p.m.
May 12 - August 21

NUR 540-MSN: Advanced Pathophysiology & Pharmacology
Expands upon basic knowledge of pathophysiology and pharmacology to provide a more in-depth understanding of human responses to interventions.  Integrates best current evidence for the effective health care management.  Students will demonstrate assimilation of technology and information literacy to access ever-changing research integration of best practices and apply findings to case studies or simulations.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:00 p.m.
May 12 - August 21

PHD 709-50: Organizational Analysis: Strategies
This course examines the theories and research regarding organizational cultures and change processes.  Students examine organizations using organizational diagnosis and development tools in an effort to support leaders as they transform their organizations into high performing entities.  Students study organizational culture and leader-follower interaction as they develop a change model using constructs from existing as well as emerging research to explain the behaviors and events in an organizational setting.  Case studies and simulations are included to enhance the analysis of emerging forms of educational, corporate and community development and improvement.  While the course will meet once per week, extensive use of WebCT is required and integrated into the course requirements.
Monday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PHD 727-50: Developing Human Resources in Organization
Course content focuses on contemporary research on employment issues as they relate to theories in organizations studies, culture, and labor economics.  this course analyzes these issues from both the individual and organizational level of analysis.  Included is the role of the leader as leaders influence others - subordinates, peers, superiors, clients, boards, owners, regulators, pressure groups, media, and others within an ever increasing global environment.  Emphasis is placed on addressing the diversity among individuals as well as the legal requirements for promoting equity and building capacity.  While the course will meet once per week, extensive use of WebCT is required and integrated into the course requirements.
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PHD 801-50: Negotiations & Conflict Resolution
This course explored the theories, policies and approaches required for conducting successful negotiations and resolving conflicts for education, community and corporate leaders.  the context includes legislation, legal issues, and alternatives to litigation.  It enhances leaders' involvement in the dispute resolution process and facilitates access to justice as central to the role of a contemporary leader.  The impact of collective bargining on negotiations int eh public sector is discussed.  Current research findings are integrated as support for various approaches in conflict resolution.  Students participate in a series of increasingly complex cases in which they assume the roles of arbitrators and key stakeholders.  While the course will meet once a week, extensive use of WebCT is required and integrated into the course requirements.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PHD 824-50: Personnel & Human Resource Dev in Ed Org
This is a course designed to provide prospective educational administrators with a broad overview of personnel administration, which is concerned with the employment, staff evaluation, development, utilization and general welfare of professional and non-exempt staff.  Examination of diversity among individuals, interpersonal relationships and legal requirements for promoting equity are included in this course.  While the course will meet once per week, extensive use of WebCT is required and integrated into the course requirements.
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

PHD 830-50: Current Issues in Education
The content of this course focuses on the complex political, societal, economic, and global issues that impact schools and districts.  Students explore issues such as diversity, federal accountability legislations, inclusion, unions, gender equity, comparative education and social justice.  The role and responsibility of the educational institution in promoting equal opportunity will be examined.  While the course will meet once per week, extensive use of WebCT is required and integrated into the course requirements.
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. -  10:30 p.m.
May 12 - July 2

This course schedule is provided for the information of the student. It is subject to change as deemed appropriate by the University in order to fulfill its role and mission or by regulatory and/or accrediting bodies specifically impacting the programs. Changes may be implemented without prior notice and without obligation, and, unless specified otherwise, are effective when made.




summer session 2014

1.888.alvernia
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