Spring Term 2017

Blended Courses - Philadelphia

Not sure if you’re ready to take a class entirely online? A blended class might be the perfect solution for you. This format offers the best of both worlds. You’ll still interact with classmates in person while you enjoy the freedom of studying where and when you want with online learning.

Students are responsible for communications software and internet service. There are both minimum and suggested requirements for computer setup. Each blended course requires additional hours of online instruction.

Enjoy the best of both worlds and take a blended class this spring!

Course Selections


Adult Education


BH 201-37: Foundations of Addictions
Concepts from psychopharmacology, genetics, counseling theory, law, medicine, sociology and other disciplines are applied to provide a basic understanding of the practical issues surrounding the prevention and treatment of substance abuse and dependence.  This course, intended for Behavioral Health majors, also requires that student complete a Child Abuse Clearance, a PA Criminal Record Check and an FBI clearance including fingerprinting. Any arrest and /or conviction may or may not prohibit a BH student from participating in Practicum coursework and gaining future employment. Satisfies Social Science requirement.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

BH 411-37: Coun. Spec. Pop: Adolescents
Issues relevant to working with special populations are examined. Impact of group membership on individual identity is explored. In addition, special populations such as the disabled, adolescents, elderly, women, sexual minorities, ethnic groups, and various professional groups (such as physicians, clergy, and lawyers) are considered. Depending on the population(s), this course can be utilized as an elective for one, two, or all three areas of concentration.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

CIS 114-37: Microcomputer Applications
Study value of microcomputer as a tool in business, school and home through projects involving use of currently popular word processing, database, and spreadsheet packages. Students may audit course only with instructor's permission.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

CJ 274-37: Corrections & Rehabilitation
Survey of the correctional field covering incarceration, institutions, probation and parole, modern correctional counseling, case method, and techniques of supervision.  Pre-requisite: CJ 101.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

CJ 302-37: Judicial Process & Procedures
Explanation of the role of the judiciary, it historical background and development in the United States with stress on due process of law, and the judicial procedure by which an arrested offender enters the system. Problems of change and reform of the process are also discussed. Prerequisite: CJ 201.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

ENG 305-37: Early American Fiction
Analysis of trends in American prose literature with emphasis on significant novelists and short story writers from early 19th century to 1900.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

PHI 220-37: Ethics & the Law
Examination and evaluation of principal theories of the nature and purpose of law: natural law, legal realism and legal positivism.  Foundations of the American legal system are examined in relation to these theories.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Fulfills Ethics/Morality Requirement.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

PSY 270-37: Intro to Scientific Methods
This course is a survey of scientific methods that enable students to understand the significance and nature of methods in the behavioral sciences and be critical consumers of research.  Prerequisite: PSY 101
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

THE 300-37: Theology of Marriage & Sexuality
Theological study of dogmatic and moral questions concerning human sexuality and marriage in light of anthropology, the scriptures, natural law, traditions, and the understanding of revelation within history.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
January 24th - March 7th

BH 304-47: Counseling Techniques II
Skills developed in Counseling Techniques I are built upon and applied to various behavioral health case studies. In addition, specific techniques such as relaxation training, assertiveness training and family intervention are introduced.  Prerequisite:   BH 303
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

BH 413-47: Special Issues Seminar: Eating Disorders
This course will address current issues within the field of addictions and mental health treatment.  Possible topics include: The role of gender and culture in therapeutic relationships, Bereavement, HIV, Adolescent Issues, Specialized Testing, the “Cultures” of Addiction and Recovery, Family Issues, Life Span Issues related to behavioral health and Program/outcomes assessment.  These courses are offered to broaden the student’s experience, as well as assuring that advancements and changes have a mechanism to be addressed within the program structure.  Course may be repeated for credit with different topics.  Depending on the issue(s) identified, this course can be utilized as an elective for one, two, or all three areas of concentration.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

CJ 201-47: Criminal Law
Study of criminal offenses by statutory and common law definition/classification; laws of arrest, search and seizure; and analysis of constitutional and statutory concepts governing introduction and use of information in formalized legal proceedings. PA Crimes Code is used as supplemental text reference.  Pre-requisite: CJ 101 and CJ 175   
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.                         
March 21st - May 2nd

CJ 377-47: Juvenile Delinquency & Justice
Nature and extent of delinquency is discussed.  Explanatory models and theories of juvenile delinquency are presented.  History, philosophy, and evaluation of juvenile court practices and procedures are presented including the role of the juvenile officer.  Prevention and intervention programs and their techniques are illustrated.  Prerequisites: CJ 101 and 175.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

COM 101-47: Composition and Research
Core writing requirement, reviews fundamental principles of rhetoric, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Requirements include a research paper using MLA documentation guidelines and several expository papers. Course is available only after placement by departmental faculty. Students must achieve "C" or better to fulfill core requirements.   
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

ENG 304-47: Satire & Sentiment
Exploring drama, fiction, and poetry by major eighteenth-century writers including Dryden, Sheridan, Defoe, Pope, Swift, and Dr. Johnson.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

MUS 333-47: Music History
In-depth exploration of origins of Western musical practice. Covers music from Medieval to Modern.  Emphasis is on evolution of style and form. Learn through lecture, score analysis, reading assignments, oral reports and directed listening.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

PED 304-47: Wellness for Life
Study of the concepts that contribute to a lifestyle of wellness. Topics include principles of wellness, principles of community health, non-infectious diseases, accident and injury prevention, AIDS, STDs, nutrition, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, strength, mental and emotional health, personality traits, stress, steroids, cancer, and substance abuse. Students appraise their personal wellness levels and design a personalized fitness program that is practically applied.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

PHI 345-47: Problems of Philosophy
A study of the fundamental problems of philosophy. Readings in Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, and contemporary Philosophy.  This course is designed as an introduction to philosophy for students in the Innovative Degree Programs (Plus Two, Mid-Degree, Degree Completion). Other students must have permission of the instructor.
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

PSY 301-47: History & Systems in Psychology
Study of the major schools in psychological thought, including philosophical and medical contributions to modern psychological views. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
March 21st - May 2nd

BUS 342-37: Business Law
Deals with the meaning and functions of business law as applied to negotiable contracts, sales, agency employment, real property, insurance, labor, anti-trust law, consumer protection, and other legal issues such as international, environmental, privacy, tort and criminal law.
Monday,  5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
January 20th - March 11th

PED 304-37: Wellness for Life
Study of the concepts that contribute to a lifestyle of wellness. Topics include principles of wellness, principles of community health, non-infectious diseases, accident and injury prevention, AIDS, STDs, nutrition, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, strength, mental and emotional health, personality traits, stress, steroids, cancer, and substance abuse. Students appraise their personal wellness levels and design a personalized fitness program that is practically applied.
Monday,  8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
January 20th - March 11th

PHI 200-47: Introduction to Ethics
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality. This course surveys major moral theories and includes a study of moral and ethical issues encountered in everyday life.  Topics include the foundations of morality, moral relativism and skepticism, freedom and responsibility, and the theories of value.  The course aims to help students develop their ability to read, write and think critically about ethical issues.
Tuesday,  8:00 p.m. - 10:20 p.m.
March 16th - May 7th

Graduate


LAS 542-37: Cultural Studies & Heritage Conservation
This course examines the multiplicity of cultures and perspectives in America as they relate to stewardship for cultural conservation on a local, national, and global scale. Cultural heritage includes languages, artifacts and materials, places, spaces, traditions, rituals, and anything significant enough for individuals to consider its management, preservation, and accessibility.
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
January 20th - March 11th

LAS 555-47: Policy & Policy Analysis
This course investigates the political and ideological factors of policy development, implementation and evaluation.  Topics include institutional and political influences, social benefits and costs, intended versus unintended consequences, and other issues.
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.
March 16th - May 7th




This course schedule is provided for the information of the student. It is subject to change as deemed appropriate by the University in order to fulfill its role and mission or by regulatory and/or accrediting bodies specifically impacting the programs. Changes may be implemented without prior notice and without obligation, and, unless specified otherwise, are effective when made.

School of Graduate & Adult Education

Philadelphia Center Contact Information

1355 West Cheltenham Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027
Phone: 215.635.4734 or
888.258.3764 X7
Fax: 215.635.4590
eMail: philadelphia@alvernia.edu
Interactive Campus Map

Office Hours
Mon. - Thurs. - 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Fri. - Appointment Only
Sat. - 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.




spring term 2017

1.888.alvernia
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