Erin Solley

Erin Solley

For Erin Solley, her junior year at Alvernia shaped up to be one that was picture perfect, quite literally. The sport management major documented her 2012 college experience, one frame at a time, one day at a time.

As part of her “365 photos” project started New Year’s Day 2012, Erin Solley ‘13, a recent graduate who majored in sport management, uploaded one photo that summarized the essence of each day of her life for a full year. “I had photos of the things I do in my daily activities and of my family and friends,” she says. “The day I got my wisdom teeth out, for example, I took a picture of my dog resting his head on my lap, looking up at me with a sympathetic expression.”

With all of Erin’s extra-curricular activities, the her photos captured her wearing a myriad of different hats. “ I am trying to get the most from my time on campus – to meet and connect with as many people as I can, hear a wide range of viewpoints, and put myself out there in personal relationships,” she says.

Strong work, on and off campus
One of the many things that attracted Erin to Alvernia in the first place was Alternative Breaks, a program that organizes weekend and week-long service and immersion trips for students to help the underserved. As part of Alternative Breaks, Erin and six fellow students and a staff site leader headed out for a week-long retreat in rural Appalachian West Virginia, where they helped impoverished homeowners whose houses were in need of repair.

Erin did a lot of hands-on work on Alvernia’s campus as well. As special events committee chair of the Campus Activities Board, she attended the National Association of Campus Activities conference and helped select the coffeehouse singers, comedians, novelty speakers and other specialty acts that performed for students.

She also played field hockey, helped educate first-year students on preventing sexual assault through a new health and wellness peer sexual assault prevention group and represented the class of 2013 as a student government class representative. All while juggling a part-time job at a local restaurant.

“Goals” for a bright future
The secret to Erin’s success? Effective time management. “There are a lot of things that interest me, and in order for me to get a chance to do all of them, I need to be organized and stay on top of it all,“ she says. “I work ahead of time, and I would be lost without my planner, where I write down all of my plans and assignments.”

Erin plans to take her zest for life into a career in the communications aspect of sport management, possibly after attending graduate school. “I would like to do public relations or event planning in the sport field; I really want to work in the National Hockey League,” she says. “I am a huge Flyers fan. I play field hockey and I wish I could play ice hockey.”

Erin’s advice for young students aspiring to build and undergraduate resume as impressive as hers: “get involved with as much as you can outside the classroom,” she says. “You will learn so much more.”


Delucia Kevin John '13 uses rifts and riffs to make an impact Delucia Erin Solley '13 and her picture perfect plan
Delucia   Martin Luther King Day of service spring 2013   Delucia Marianne Sharon M '11 helps pet lovers say good bye


Did you know?

A National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study found that participating employers and recent college graduates agreed on the necessity of out of the classroom experiences. The study emphasizes the importance of providing students with important knowledge and skills but also experience putting that knowledge and skills to practical use in "real-world" settings.

Did you know?

Seventy-six percent of participating employers put "teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse group settings" at the top of their list of desired capabilities in new employees, according to a National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study. These are among the skills fostered by real-world learning experiences.

Did you know?

Service learning is a method of providing personal and academic development through work with established nonprofit organizations in the community. It is an avenue to introduce students to a professional environment without the extensive commitments of an internship.

Did you know?

Service learning provides ideal real world learning opportunities. According to SmartBlog on Leadership, doing volunteer and service work for a non-profit organization that is connected to your major or academic program of study helps develop leadership skills, expands your perspective of the world, allows you to discover new skills in a safe environment, and develops a larger network of real world contacts to draw upon once you graduate.

Did you know?

Service learning can take you outside of your comfort zone, giving you an opportunity to work with new challenges, people, politics and interpersonal dynamics. It also offers new perspective on priorities. Hanging out with people who have had different life experiences encourages you to tackle challenges from different angles. Julie Zolfo, founder of Make Success Matter said that she volunteered for six weeks at the schools in New Delhi, India.

Did you know?

"Alvernia's Career Development Center works with students to find avenues for employment, internships, co-ops, career exploration, resume development, and graduate school options. Center staff help students assess their options and identify their own "brand" to complement their life after Alvernia.

Did you know?

A recent career fair at Alvernia attracted more than 55 employers who were seeking to hire employees, co-ops and interns for their organizations. Career fairs like this one are fertile ground for students seeking real world learning opportunities and to reap the benefits of such as employers look to to hire staff members who have honed their skills and abilities via practical experiences in real situations.

Did you know?

Since its inception, Alvernia has offered real world opportunities with an emphasis on service and careers that help those in need. Field experiences in areas like criminal justice, social work, nursing, occupational therapy, health care science and teacher training among others provide our students with rich learning opportunities to test drive what it's like to work in that profession.

Did you know?

In a recent American Association of Colleges and Universities survey of 302 employers, 79 percent said institutions of higher learning should emphasize helping students apply what they learn in real-world settings, and 66 percent said that completing an internship or community field project would help prepare students for success.