Jonathan Lozoskie

Jonathan Lozoskie ‘13 plays to win

When Jonathan Lozoskie chose Alvernia for its relative small size, he never imagined the hugeness of his eventual college experience. During his time at Alvernia, he was an academic standout in the school’s five-year Master of Science in Occupational Therapy program, and was an integral part of Alvernia’s lacrosse team. He also acted as a role model for incoming students as a head orientation leader where he counseled freshmen as a peer mentor.

“I think college is the time for you to really find out who you are as an individual, and the best way to do that is to get involved around campus,” Lozoskie says. “I am very happy with my college choice because of all of the friends and different connections I have made here,” he says.

Making for a smooth transition
Lozoskie looks fondly upon the first few days that kicked off his college career. “I had a really great experience during my orientation weekend,” he says. To help make other incoming students feel just as welcomed and enthusiastic about the transformative four to five years that lie ahead, Lozoskie acted as head orientation leader. “I really just wanted to show incoming students how welcoming Alvernia is and introduce them to all that the university has to offer,” he says.

Once incoming students settled in, Lozoskie continued to guide them as a peer mentor. “I helped freshmen with any problems that would arise in their classes or just with their transition during the first semester,” he says.

Another factor that made Lozoskie’s transition to Alvernia so smooth was his position on Alvernia’s lacrosse team. “I believe moving from high school to college was so much easier because of lacrosse; I met new people who eventually became not only my teammates, but my good friends,” he says. “Plus, playing lacrosse at Alvernia has given me a lot of skills I will be able to use when I graduate — determination, hard work, communication, teamwork and leadership.”

Hands-on career training
Off the lacrosse field and in the classroom, Lozoskie has benefited from Alvernia’s small class size and hands-on opportunities in his chosen career of occupational therapy. “The OT curriculum has built-in fieldwork experiences that allow students to observe professional occupational therapists for two semesters during our junior year and then treat patients for 24 weeks during our senior year,” Lozoskie says. “All of these experiences have helped train me for my ultimate goal: to work as a traveling occupational therapist, either within the United States or abroad.”

Lozoskie’s advice for the undergraduate students he welcomes and mentors: “Try everything at Alvernia. You never know who you may meet or the experiences you may have.”

Did you know?

A National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study found that participating employers and recent college graduates agreed on the necessity of out of the classroom experiences. The study emphasizes the importance of providing students with important knowledge and skills but also experience putting that knowledge and skills to practical use in "real-world" settings.

Did you know?

Seventy-six percent of participating employers put "teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse group settings" at the top of their list of desired capabilities in new employees, according to a National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study. These are among the skills fostered by real-world learning experiences.

Did you know?

Service learning is a method of providing personal and academic development through work with established nonprofit organizations in the community. It is an avenue to introduce students to a professional environment without the extensive commitments of an internship.

Did you know?

Service learning provides ideal real world learning opportunities. According to SmartBlog on Leadership, doing volunteer and service work for a non-profit organization that is connected to your major or academic program of study helps develop leadership skills, expands your perspective of the world, allows you to discover new skills in a safe environment, and develops a larger network of real world contacts to draw upon once you graduate.

Did you know?

Service learning can take you outside of your comfort zone, giving you an opportunity to work with new challenges, people, politics and interpersonal dynamics. It also offers new perspective on priorities. Hanging out with people who have had different life experiences encourages you to tackle challenges from different angles. Julie Zolfo, founder of Make Success Matter said that she volunteered for six weeks at the schools in New Delhi, India.

Did you know?

"Alvernia's Career Development Center works with students to find avenues for employment, internships, co-ops, career exploration, resume development, and graduate school options. Center staff help students assess their options and identify their own "brand" to complement their life after Alvernia.

Did you know?

A recent career fair at Alvernia attracted more than 55 employers who were seeking to hire employees, co-ops and interns for their organizations. Career fairs like this one are fertile ground for students seeking real world learning opportunities and to reap the benefits of such as employers look to to hire staff members who have honed their skills and abilities via practical experiences in real situations.

Did you know?

Since its inception, Alvernia has offered real world opportunities with an emphasis on service and careers that help those in need. Field experiences in areas like criminal justice, social work, nursing, occupational therapy, health care science and teacher training among others provide our students with rich learning opportunities to test drive what it's like to work in that profession.

Did you know?

In a recent American Association of Colleges and Universities survey of 302 employers, 79 percent said institutions of higher learning should emphasize helping students apply what they learn in real-world settings, and 66 percent said that completing an internship or community field project would help prepare students for success.