Kevin John

JohnDuring his first two years at Alvernia, junior Kevin John '13 discovered his true love: community. “I’m fascinated by the uniqueness of people and their circumstances; I have a passion to be with people where they are,” John says.

As his strengths and true desires became more evident to him, John decided to change his major from occupational therapy to social work. He has not looked back. John says, “Every person, no matter what his or her situation, is valuable and worthy of care.”

A far-reaching love
John’s love for community stretched throughout Alvernia’s campus and beyond. On campus, he provided support and care as a resident assistant in Veronica Hall, where he “watched 13 freshmen who didn’t know each other slowly build friendships and create a wonderful atmosphere to learn and grow with each other.”

John was also heavily involved with Alvernia’s InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, where he co-lead a small group bible study that met in the Veronica Hall Chapel.

Off campus, John had fieldwork at Olivet Boys and Girls Club, where he worked with two programs — DREAM, an initiative for adolescents who have had problems with the law, and MAP, a mentorship program that teaches adolescents to paint and draw under the direction of a commissioned artist.

Self-discovery through musical meditation
To balance his hours of working with others, John likes to grab his guitar and head outside on a nice day. “There is something about being close to nature while I play – it’s both energizing and relaxing,” he says, John began teaching himself how to play the guitar through videos on the Internet a little over a year ago, and he hasn’t put it down since, using it as his “method to recover; a sort of meditation and therapy.” He particularly likes playing Christian worship music, and he often plays for Campus Ministry on Worship Nights.

Concerning his plans for the future, John says, “my journey is very much incomplete. I love learning about social work and everything that comes with it, but I am still searching for a definite career path. I have so many options in front of me – it is difficult to choose just one.”

John admits he has had numerous shortcomings and failed attempts during his college years thus far, but he tries to always move forward with faith. “I’ve learned the most from myself through the heartache and failures,” he says. “And I’ve also made a commitment to take advantage of all the opportunities that arise for me at Alvernia, and through my experiences, I discovered my desire to serve.”

Delucia Kevin John '13 uses rifts and riffs to make an impact Delucia Erin Solley '13 and her picture perfect plan
Delucia   Martin Luther King Day of service spring 2013   Delucia Marianne Sharon M '11 helps pet lovers say good bye




Did you know?

A National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study found that participating employers and recent college graduates agreed on the necessity of out of the classroom experiences. The study emphasizes the importance of providing students with important knowledge and skills but also experience putting that knowledge and skills to practical use in "real-world" settings.

Did you know?

Seventy-six percent of participating employers put "teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse group settings" at the top of their list of desired capabilities in new employees, according to a National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study. These are among the skills fostered by real-world learning experiences.

Did you know?

Service learning is a method of providing personal and academic development through work with established nonprofit organizations in the community. It is an avenue to introduce students to a professional environment without the extensive commitments of an internship.

Did you know?

Service learning provides ideal real world learning opportunities. According to SmartBlog on Leadership, doing volunteer and service work for a non-profit organization that is connected to your major or academic program of study helps develop leadership skills, expands your perspective of the world, allows you to discover new skills in a safe environment, and develops a larger network of real world contacts to draw upon once you graduate.

Did you know?

Service learning can take you outside of your comfort zone, giving you an opportunity to work with new challenges, people, politics and interpersonal dynamics. It also offers new perspective on priorities. Hanging out with people who have had different life experiences encourages you to tackle challenges from different angles. Julie Zolfo, founder of Make Success Matter said that she volunteered for six weeks at the schools in New Delhi, India.

Did you know?

"Alvernia's Career Development Center works with students to find avenues for employment, internships, co-ops, career exploration, resume development, and graduate school options. Center staff help students assess their options and identify their own "brand" to complement their life after Alvernia.

Did you know?

A recent career fair at Alvernia attracted more than 55 employers who were seeking to hire employees, co-ops and interns for their organizations. Career fairs like this one are fertile ground for students seeking real world learning opportunities and to reap the benefits of such as employers look to to hire staff members who have honed their skills and abilities via practical experiences in real situations.

Did you know?

Since its inception, Alvernia has offered real world opportunities with an emphasis on service and careers that help those in need. Field experiences in areas like criminal justice, social work, nursing, occupational therapy, health care science and teacher training among others provide our students with rich learning opportunities to test drive what it's like to work in that profession.

Did you know?

In a recent American Association of Colleges and Universities survey of 302 employers, 79 percent said institutions of higher learning should emphasize helping students apply what they learn in real-world settings, and 66 percent said that completing an internship or community field project would help prepare students for success.