Cathy Faust

From Courtroom to Classroom

Cathy FaustThe law always intrigued Cathy Faust. The 2007 Alvernia graduate first majored in political science with the intention of attending law school after graduation. But, one fateful day in the courtroom changed that forever. While witnessing a trial first hand, Faust saw all the challenges lawyers must face, including a harrowing fast-pace and generous amount of paperwork. It didn’t take long for her to reconsider her career path.

“I went into political science wanting to help people,” explained Faust. “Lawyers do that but also need to navigate a great deal of administrative work and juggle so many cases that you can lose sight of the people you are trying to help,” explained Faust.

She found herself at a crossroads and decided to seek the counsel of her mentor, Victoria Williams, professor of Humanities. Williams was able to help Cathy think through her options and clarify her career direction. By the end of the day she had decided to switch majors to education, with the goal to become a school teacher.

“It was the greatest decision I have made for my career and myself,” said Faust who now teaches high school social studies at Lebanon High School and is also able to share her passion for tennis as head coach. “It is so rewarding to have students come back to me after a few years and still remember my classes and how they helped mold students and impact their futures.”

Did you know?

A National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study found that participating employers and recent college graduates agreed on the necessity of out of the classroom experiences. The study emphasizes the importance of providing students with important knowledge and skills but also experience putting that knowledge and skills to practical use in "real-world" settings.

Did you know?

Seventy-six percent of participating employers put "teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse group settings" at the top of their list of desired capabilities in new employees, according to a National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America's Promise study. These are among the skills fostered by real-world learning experiences.

Did you know?

Service learning is a method of providing personal and academic development through work with established nonprofit organizations in the community. It is an avenue to introduce students to a professional environment without the extensive commitments of an internship.

Did you know?

Service learning provides ideal real world learning opportunities. According to SmartBlog on Leadership, doing volunteer and service work for a non-profit organization that is connected to your major or academic program of study helps develop leadership skills, expands your perspective of the world, allows you to discover new skills in a safe environment, and develops a larger network of real world contacts to draw upon once you graduate.

Did you know?

Service learning can take you outside of your comfort zone, giving you an opportunity to work with new challenges, people, politics and interpersonal dynamics. It also offers new perspective on priorities. Hanging out with people who have had different life experiences encourages you to tackle challenges from different angles. Julie Zolfo, founder of Make Success Matter said that she volunteered for six weeks at the schools in New Delhi, India.

Did you know?

"Alvernia's Career Development Center works with students to find avenues for employment, internships, co-ops, career exploration, resume development, and graduate school options. Center staff help students assess their options and identify their own "brand" to complement their life after Alvernia.

Did you know?

A recent career fair at Alvernia attracted more than 55 employers who were seeking to hire employees, co-ops and interns for their organizations. Career fairs like this one are fertile ground for students seeking real world learning opportunities and to reap the benefits of such as employers look to to hire staff members who have honed their skills and abilities via practical experiences in real situations.

Did you know?

Since its inception, Alvernia has offered real world opportunities with an emphasis on service and careers that help those in need. Field experiences in areas like criminal justice, social work, nursing, occupational therapy, health care science and teacher training among others provide our students with rich learning opportunities to test drive what it's like to work in that profession.

Did you know?

In a recent American Association of Colleges and Universities survey of 302 employers, 79 percent said institutions of higher learning should emphasize helping students apply what they learn in real-world settings, and 66 percent said that completing an internship or community field project would help prepare students for success.