AT 101 (3 credits)

Introduction to Athletic Training

This course is intended to introduce students to the profession of athletic training and sports medicine; including history, function, career opportunities and professional standards of the national (NATA) and state (PATS) organizations, as well as the educational objectives of the Athletic Training major. Facilities where athletic training is practiced, types of clients treated, equipment used, and the various relationships with other healthcare professionals are discussed.  Students spend a minimum of 25 observational hours and a maximum of 30 observational hours with a preceptor at the university's facilities.

AT 113 (3 credits)

Emergency Response

Provides the knowledge, skills, and confidences to help a person who is a victim of injury or sudden illness. Students learn how to assess a person’s condition and how to recognize and care for life-threatening emergencies. Students will also receive OSHA training in the handling of blood borne pathogens. Students spend a minimum of 25 observational hours and a maximum of 30 observational hours with a preceptor at the university’s facilities.

AT 206 (4 credits)

Therapeutic Exercise

Study of the basic types of exercises applied in the treatment of disease and injury.  Emphasis is on the teaching aspect of working with the physically active client. Introduction to the physiological effects of exercise and the basic principle of joint range of motion, manual muscle testing and functional activities. Use of mechanical exercise equipment is also taught, stressing safety during exercise, signs of over dosage and use of proper body mechanics. Correct and incorrect exercise procedures as well as indications and contraindications for different exercise are reviewed. Student will acquire skills in performing goniometric measurements. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites: BIO 107, 108, 117, and 118.

AT 209 (4 credits)

Therapeutic Modalities and Treatment Techniques

Students are introduced to theory, application, and treatment of therapeutic modalities including: moist heat, cryotherapy, paraffin, infrared, ultra violet, fluidotherapy, spinal traction, ultrasound, magnetic therapy, hydrotherapy, and diathermy. Indications, contraindications, and precautions are emphasized. This course provides the knowledge, skills and values that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to plan, implement, document, and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites: BIO 107, 108, 117, and 118.

AT 222 (4 credits)

Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Introduction to the concepts of injury prevention, recognition and management, as they relate to athletics. Integrates three hours lecture and two hours lab weekly. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

AT 250 (5 credits)

Recognition and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries I

Students taking this course will be able to conduct thorough clinical injury/illness evaluation and determine the nature, type and severity of injuries for the basis of providing First Aid/Emergency Care, referring for medical diagnosis/treatment and follow up treatment. Major focus is on the upper extremities. A minimum of 50 and a maximum of 75 hours working with a preceptor at the university's facilities is required. This course requires three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite: BIO 107, 108, 117, and 118.

AT 251 (5 credits)

Recognition and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries II

Students taking this course will be able to conduct thorough clinical injury/illness evaluations and determine the nature, type and severity of injuries for the basis of providing First Aid/Emergency Care, referring for medical diagnosis/treatment and follow up treatment. Major focus is on the lower extremities. A minimum of 50 and a maximum of 75 hours working with a preceptor at the university's facilities is required. This course requires three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite: BIO 107, 108, 117, and 118.

AT 301 (3 credits)

Advanced Athletic Training Procedures

Advanced rehabilitation science procedures. Movement science focuses on a study of normal motor control and on movement abilities. This course discusses current applied neurosciences concepts to allow students to practice the application of motor learning principles to rehabilitation. The electro-therapy unit includes an in-depth discussion of electro-physiology, the instrumentation and application of various types of transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Integrates two hours lecture and two hours lab weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 107, 108, 117, 118, 211.

AT 310 (5 credits)

Athletic Training Clinical I

Course includes both seminar and practical application. Students spend a minimum of 200 hours and maximum 320 hours working with a Preceptor at the University’s facilities or an affiliated site. Major focus is on lower extremities. Students spend 10 hours working with a physician in an orthopedic office setting.  Prerequisite: AT 206, 209, 251 or permission of Program Director.

AT 311 (5 credits)

Athletic Training Clinical II

Course includes both seminar and practical application. Students spend a minimum of 200 hours and maximum 320 hours working with a Preceptor at  the  University’s facilities or  at  an affiliated site. Major focus is on upper extremities. Students spend 10 hours working with a physician in an orthopedic office setting.  Prerequisite: AT 310.

AT 321 (2 credits)

Strength and Conditioning Techniques for Rehabilitation Professionals

Course includes a functional, scientific approach to the design of strength and conditioning programs.  Includes testing protocols used for measuring fitness, body composition, posture, flexibility, muscular strength, power, speed, and endurance. General fitness, wellness, and sports nutrition concepts and dietary supplements will be discussed. Course includes 1 hour of lecture and 2 hours of lab weekly.  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

AT 340 (3 credits)

Organization and Administration of Athletic Training

Organization and administration of athletic training programs as identified by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, in the "Competencies in Athletic Training document." Topics include licensing, continuing education requirements, record keeping, purchasing and maintenance of equipment and facilities, and policies and procedures for the operation of athletic training program. Practical experiences are interwoven throughout the course.

AT 410 (5 credits)

Athletic Training Clinical III

Course includes both seminar and practical application. Students spend a minimum of 200 hours and maximum 320 hours working with a Preceptor at the University’s facilities or an affiliated site. Major focus is on contact sports and general medical conditions and disabilities. Students spend a minimum of 10 observational hours and a maximum of 15 observational hours with a preceptor at a general medical facility.  Prerequisite: AT 310 and 311, or permission of Program Director.

AT 411 (5 credits)

Athletic Training Clinical IV

Course includes both seminar and practical application. Students spend a minimum of 200  and maximum of 320 hours working with a Preceptor at the University’s facilities or an affiliated site. Major focus will be on psychosocial intervention and counseling techniques. Prerequisite: AT 310 and 311, or permission of Program Director.

AT 433 (3 credits)

Exercise Physiology

Study of the application of physiological principles of human performance to sports/exercise including theories and principles for improving performance. Examination of current literature and research. Focus on examples for athletic training and coaching application. Prerequisites: BIO 107, 108, 117, and 118.

AT 440 (2 credits)

Pharmacology in Athletic Training

Study of pharmacologic applications for injury/illness to athletes and the physically active.  Includes indications, contraindications, interactions of medications, and relevant governing regulations

AT 445 (3 credits)

Senior Capstone I

This course explores quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used in athletic training and evaluation of published research in the field. The capstone activity involves designing a research project and presenting it for Institutional Review Board approval.  Basic format and organization issues are covered, along with how to identify a research topic, access resources, and write a literature review.  Pre-requisite: MAT 208 and Senior Status.

AT 446 (3 credit)

Senior Capstone II

This senior level capstone class involves the completion of a research project developed and designed in the previous course, AT 445. The student will carry out the research, analyze the data, and present the project. This course will cover content related to preparation for the BOC examination as well as professional development and responsibilities of the entry-level athletic trainer, including continuing education and ethical responsibilities. Pre-requisite: AT 445.

Contact Information

 

Kimberly J. Stoudt, Ed.D., LAT, ATC, EMT, EMT-T

Program Director
Assistant Professor/
Assistant Athletic Trainer 

     Physical Education Center, B13
     Phone: 610.796-8335
     Fax: 610.796.8349
     Email:kim.stoudt@alvernia.edu